Home > Wine > Living in the Limelight

Living in the Limelight

November 29, 2012 Leave a comment Go to comments

I wrote a series of posts four months ago about our trip to Walla Walla, the centerpiece of which was our two days of behind-the-scenes winery visits. (Day one here and day two here.) In addition to the kindness of winery owners and winemakers in showing us around, we were also blessed by the patient guidance of local wine expert and businessman Philippe. He is the owner of Oak Tradition, purveyor to the trade of barrels, corks, and much more.

Our first stop on day two was Rasa Vineyards. At the time, I wrote:

It is run by two brothers, Pinto and Billo Naravane. Both left the computer industry to start up the winery, Pinto on the business side and Billo as winemaker. As at the wineries the day before, we were the beneficiaries of extraordinary generosity, as Billo spent over an hour with us, telling us stories about the winery, his career path, and the individual wines as we tasted them. He had studied applied math at MIT, then moved on to Stanford for a Master’s in electrical engineering and to Texas for a Ph.D. But he left the PhD program partway through to begin work in the computer industry. When the time came to leave it all behind for wine, he headed to Davis for another Master’s, in their famous wine program.

The mathematical backgrounds of Billo and Pinto are reflected in the names of some of their wines. My friend Paul makes it a point, whenever he encounters a wine with a name that — by intention or chance — has a name with a mathematical connotation, to photograph it and post to Facebook. This is how I first met two Rasa wines, QED and Principia. On first arriving at Rasa, I was delighted to see them. As Billo explains, Rasa is the rare winery that doesn’t display their own name prominently on the label. The conceptual wine name takes pride of place. This is a risky marketing strategy, as illustrated by my lack of awareness of who exactly produces QED and Principia. But Rasa sells what it produces, and is happy to proceed this way. You can see more of their beautiful labels here.

The brothers make more than just attractive labels. The wines were excellent. We bought more of theirs than anyone else’s, including two bottles of the 2008 Creative Impulse, a cab/merlot blend that was our most expensive purchase of the trip. They will need to lie down a while before we open them.

In addition to Creative Impulse, we bought a bottle of Principia and a bottle of Living in the Limelight. They’ve all been lying down in the basement, happily ignored. However, on receipt of our latest club shipment of Porter Creek pinots two weeks ago (see here for a post on last spring’s shipment and links to earlier posts on Porter Creek), I reorganized our reds, prompting me to decide that we should start tasting some of the Rasa and other Walla Walla purchases.

Thanksgiving gave us a natural opportunity. A week ago, I brought up the bottle of Living in the Limelight. What is it? I didn’t remember. The name gives no clue. But the label does say petit verdot, and the website explains:

The 2009 Living in the Limelight comprises of 90% Petit Verdot, 5% Cab Franc, and 5% Cabernet Sauvignon. Petit Verdot, a classic Bordeaux varietal, is typically cast in a supporting role – providing acid and color to Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot-dominated wines.

But this Petit Verdot is so compelling, we had to put it in the limelight. In this wine, Petit Verdot is the main actor with Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet Franc in supporting roles.

Clever.

More important, the wine is superb. I lack the vocabulary to describe it adequately. Fortunately, the winemaker has no such problem:

This wine is a rarity: a Petit Verdot with finesse, power, and complexity. Blackberry, black plum, dark chocolate, with hints of vanilla and rose petal on the bouquet. Intense notes of blackberry and black cherry on palate, supported by tobacco, dark chocolate, earth, and tar notes. All of these flavors are beautifully focused and framed in substantial, yet silky tannins. The balance between medium-plus acidity, 15% alcohol, fruit extract, and tannins is superb. The finish lingers with pure blackberry and dark chocolate notes. No doubt many will prefer the fruity exuberance of this wine, but properly cellared this wine will gain further complexity as it ages.

We will order more. Then we can be patient and enjoy the complexity.

Advertisements
Categories: Wine
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: