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Quote of the Day

February 21, 2013 Leave a comment Go to comments
President Obama and John Brennan, January 2010

President Obama and John Brennan, January 2010

[Official White House photo by Pete Souza]

I have become so enamored of Charles Pierce’s politics blog at Esquire that I could put up three or four quote-of-the-day posts every weekday from his writings alone. I regularly flag his posts as potential blog material, then decide not to overdo it. Better just to have a permanent pointer to his blog and leave it at that. But on reading one of today’s posts, I knew I had to feature it. (And now I see, catching up on a review of the day’s twitter feeds, that I’m not alone. Glenn Greenwald tweeted, “Charles Pierce on Obama, transparency and assassinations – 2 paragraphs – just please read.”)

The starting point is today’s NYT article by Scott Shane and Mark Mazzetti on drones and the Senate hearings for John Brennan’s nomination as the new CIA director. They write:

The White House is refusing to share fully with Congress the legal opinions that justify targeted killings, while maneuvering to make sure its stance does not do anything to endanger the confirmation of John O. Brennan as C.I.A. director.

Rather than agreeing to some Democratic senators’ demands for full access to the classified legal memos on the targeted killing program, Obama administration officials are negotiating with Republicans to provide more information on the lethal attack last year on the American diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya, according to three Congressional staff members.

The strategy is intended to produce a bipartisan majority vote for Mr. Brennan in the Senate Intelligence Committee without giving its members seven additional legal opinions on targeted killing sought by senators and while protecting what the White House views as the confidentiality of the Justice Department’s legal advice to the president. It would allow Mr. Brennan’s nomination to go to the Senate floor even if one or two Democrats vote no to protest the refusal to share more legal memos.

To which Pierce responds (emphasis mine):

First, we have the ongoing charade of “transparency” as regards the president’s assumed right to kill Americans anywhere in the world including, absent a clear statement from this administration, which has not been forthcoming, within the borders of the United States. Then we have the drone program itself, which is a constitutional abomination no matter how effective you presume it is. Then, we have another attempt to reach a kind of bipartisan consensus with the various vandals and predatory fauna in the other party. And then, last, as part of the attempt at bipartisan consensus, a deal is struck in which the president’s hit list is kept in a vault while more fuel is fed into the Benghazi!, BENGHAZI!, BENGHAZI!!!!!!!111!!! infernal machine … .

This is what happens when you elect someone — anyone — to the presidency as that office is presently constituted. Of all the various Washington mystery cults, the one at that end of Pennsylvania Avenue is the most impenetrable. This is why the argument many liberals are making — that the drone program is acceptable both morally and as a matter of practical politics because of the faith you have in the guy who happens to be presiding over it at the moment — is criminally naive, intellectually empty, and as false as blue money to the future. The powers we have allowed to leach away from their constitutional points of origin into that office have created in the presidency a foul strain of outlawry that (worse) is now seen as the proper order of things. If that is the case, and I believe it is, then the very nature of the presidency of the United States at its core has become the vehicle for permanently unlawful behavior. Every four years, we elect a new criminal because that’s become the precise job description.

Strong words, but are they wrong? Greenwald tweets that “the last 2 sentences are perfect on every level.” I’m afraid so.

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