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Pirouette

September 22, 2013 Leave a comment

pirouette

We’ve been sitting on a bottle of Long Shadows Vintners’ 2009 Pirouette for a while, finally finding the occasion two Fridays ago to open it. Andy and Cynthia were here to join us for a pre-Yom-Kippur dinner, which warranted a good bottle, and the Pirouette was it.

Long Shadows is becoming one of our favorite Washington wineries. From the website:

Long Shadows brings seven highly acclaimed vintners from the major wine regions of the world to Washington State, each an owner-partner in a unique winery dedicated to producing Columbia Valley wines that showcase the best of this growing region.

Founded in 2003, Long Shadows is the brainchild of Washington wine luminary Allen Shoup. As president and CEO of Chateau Ste. Michelle and its affiliated wineries, Allen spent 20 years building the reputation of the growing region … .

After leaving Ste. Michelle in 2000, Allen’s commitment to advancing the Columbia Valley remained undaunted. He spent the next three years developing Long Shadows, a proposition that was as simple as it was complex: recruit a cadre of the finest winemakers in the world; give each vintner access to Washington State’s best grapes; and outfit a winery to accommodate a diverse group of winemakers’ exacting cellar specifications.

With the vision in place, Allen began by introducing a dream team of celebrated vintners to the vines and wines of the growing region. The idea quickly sold itself; and from the beginning, the wines have enjoyed critical acclaim that has continued to grow, vintage after vintage.

The Pirouette is made by Philippe Melka and Agustin Huneeus.

Philippe Melka and Agustin Huneeus, Sr. teamed to combine the traditions of old world winemaking, the advancements of new world technology, and small lots from Washington State’s finest vineyards to craft this enticing red blend.

The 2009 is a blend of 57% Cabernet Sauvignon, 27% Merlot, 13% Cabernet Franc, and 3% Malbec. Oh, right, it says so right there on the bottle, pictured at the top. I really didn’t need to add much. The bottle just about says it all.

What the bottle doesn’t say is that it was as fine a bottle of wine as we have drunk in ages. Unfortunately, we bought just the one, and they’re now sold out. Perhaps we should invest in the 2010.

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Categories: Wine

Our Border Patrol

September 22, 2013 Leave a comment

usborderpatrol

One casualty of our extended kitchen remodel is my listening to NPR’s On the Media, which is broadcast here in Seattle on Sunday evenings from 6:00 to 7:00. Sunday used to be my evening to cook dinner. (Gail, don’t laugh.) Okay, not so much lately, or in the months before the remodel, but if I cooked at all, that was the night. And while cooking, or doing dishes, I would listen to OTM.

This week’s edition has a compelling story, one I would have missed altogether if not for the New Yorker’s Philip Gourevitch, whose twitter feed I follow. This morning, he tweeted, “Listen, please, to this report on unaccountable Border Patrol abuse of US citizens by Sarah Abdurrahman.” I dutifully followed the link and listened, making this evening’s broadcast dispensable.

Abdurrahman is an OTM producer and was herself the subject of such abuse. The title of her piece is “My detainment story or: how I learned to stop feeling safe in my own country and hate border patrol.” The website explains:

Earlier this month, OTM producer Sarah Abdurrahman, her family, and her friends were detained for hours by US Customs and Border Protection on their way home from Canada. Everyone being held was a US citizen, and no one received an explanation. Sarah tells the story of their detainment, and her difficulty getting any answers from one of the least transparent agencies in the country.

When you can spare twenty minutes, give the story a listen.

You may also wish to see the US Customs and Border Protection website, from which I’ve taken the photo up top. Its caption: “The priority mission of the Border Patrol is preventing terrorists and terrorists’ weapons, including weapons of mass destruction, from entering the United States.”

Categories: Government, Security

Chris Horner at the Vuelta

September 22, 2013 Leave a comment

Chris Horner

[Photograph: Rodrigo Garcia/Corbis]

A week ago, nearly-42-year-old Chris Horner stunned the cycling world by winning the Vuelta a España, the last of the season’s three-week-long grand tours. Unfortunately, the race was difficult to follow in the US, and his feat received limited coverage.

The second of the tours, the Tour de France, has become a major sports story here. But good luck if you want to follow the Giro d’Italia or the Vuelta. Part of the problem is that television coverage in the US is restricted to NBC’s Universal Sports, which is not generally available. (I complained about this last month in the context of the track and field world championships.) Internet streaming is restricted as well, offered only to those with cable or satellite packages that include Universal. So forget watching it.

And forget reading any coverage in US papers other than short AP reports such as this one:

The American veteran Christopher Horner won the Vuelta a España on Sunday at the age of 41, making him the oldest champion of one of cycling’s three-week grand tours.

Horner completed the traditional arrival to the Spanish capital with his RadioShack-Leopard team-mates without mishap.

Horner, who will turn 42 next month, beat his nearest challenger, Vincenzo Nibali, by finishing ahead of the Italian in each of the final three mountainous stages before Sunday’s 110km flat ride from Leganes to Madrid.

Michael Matthews won the 21st and final stage in a sprint.

The previous oldest winner for one of the three grand tours – the Vuelta, Tour de France and Giro d’Italia – was Fermin Lambot, who won the 1922 Tour at the age of 36.

How Horner won is worth a few words. His challenger Vincenzo Nibali is one of the world’s best riders, in his prime at 28 years old. He has had great success in all three tours, with a win and a second place in the Vuelta (2009 and 2012), third, second, and first in the Giro (2009, 2019, 2012), and a third in the Tour (2011). On Thursday of week three, Nibali began the stage in first place overall, 28 seconds ahead of Horner and poised to win another grand tour.

Thursday brought the first of three intense mountain stages, on each of which Horner finished ahead of Nibali. By the end of Thursday’s stage, Horner was just 3 seconds behind Nibali overall. A day later, he was 3 seconds ahead. And Saturday, in an astonishing performance, Horner finished second on the stage, 28 seconds ahead of Valverde in third and Nibali in fourth, thereby extending his overall lead to 37 seconds over Nibali and 1′ 36″ over Valverde. The final day in Madrid is left for the sprinters to fight for stage victory, with the overall leaders maintaining their positions. Hence, Horner had victory in hand.

I would have loved to watch those mountain stages.

Categories: Cycling

Nothing New Under the Sun

September 22, 2013 1 comment

alfalfa

The big domestic political news a few days ago was the House vote to make deep cuts in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP (food stamps). This was a follow up to the House Republicans’ decision earlier in the summer to separate SNAP from the farm bill and approve ongoing subsidies to farmers. And this despite the fact that the cost is minimal, the benefits enormous. I mean, food!

According to the Congressional Budget Office, nearly four million people would be removed from the food stamp program under the House bill starting next year. The budget office said after that, about three million a year would be cut off from the program.

The budget office said that, left unchanged, the number of food stamp recipients would decline by about 14 million people — or 30 percent — over the next 10 years as the economy improves. A Census Bureau report released on Tuesday found that the program had kept about four million people above the poverty level and had prevented millions more from sinking further into poverty. The census data also showed nearly 47 million people living in poverty — close to the highest level in two decades.

Historically, the food stamp program has been part of the farm bill, a huge piece of legislation that had routinely been passed every five years, authorizing financing for the nation’s farm and nutrition programs. But in July, House leaders split the bill’s farm and nutrition sections into separate measures, passing the farm legislation over Democrats’ objections.

The move came after the House rejected a proposed farm bill that would have cut $20 billion from the food stamp program. Conservative lawmakers helped kill the bill, saying the program needed deeper cuts.

I don’t quote Paul Krugman often. You don’t need me to find him. But he nailed it in his blog yesterday.

The idea that food stamps represent a problem — not a small blessing that has made this ongoing economic disaster marginally less awful — represents an awesome combination of ignorance and cruelty.

See too this passage five decades ago from Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 (courtesy of Atrios in a post yesterday in which he added the comment, “Our politics never changes”).

Major Major’s father was a sober God-fearing man whose idea of a good joke was to lie about his age. He was a longlimbed farmer, a God-fearing, freedom-loving, law-abiding rugged individualist who held that federal aid to anyone but farmers was creeping socialism. He advocated thrift and hard work and disapproved of loose women who turned him down. His specialty was alfalfa, and he made a good thing out of not growing any. The government paid him well for every bushel of alfalfa he did not grow. The more alfalfa he did not grow, the more money the government gave him, and he spent every penny he didn’t earn on new land to increase the amount of alfalfa he did not produce. Major Major’s father worked without rest at not growing alfalfa. On long winter evenings he remained indoors and did not mend harness, and he sprang out of bed at the crack of noon every day just to make certain that the chores would not be done. He invested in land wisely and soon was not growing more alfalfa than any other man in the county. Neighbors sought him out for advice on all subjects, for he had made much money and was therefore wise. “As ye sow, so shall ye reap,” he counseled one and all, and everyone said, “Amen.”

Major Major’s father was an outspoken champion of economy in government, provided it did not interfere with the sacred duty of government to pay farmers as much as they could get for all the alfalfa they produced that no one else wanted or for not producing any alfalfa at all. He was a proud and independent man who was opposed to unemployment insurance and never hesitated to whine, whimper, wheedle and extort for as much as he could get from whomever he could.

Categories: Politics, Writing

Policy Change

September 22, 2013 Leave a comment

policychange

So many posts to write. So little time. I’ve been thinking for a while of a policy change here at Ron’s View: shorter posts.

I’ve generally not wanted simply to link to an article, or quote from one, though I do that from time to time. I try to add something of value. Or maybe not of value, but at least of myself. However, the posts just aren’t pouring out.

Therefore, I am announcing a change. I’m going to be writing shorter and less-thought-out posts. If I have more to say, I can always return to the topic.

Let’s see if I can turn out a few posts this evening under the new policy.

Categories: Writing