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Saints of the Shadow Bible

December 15, 2013 Leave a comment Go to comments

rankinsaints

I explained a week ago, in my post on Ari Shavit’s My Promised Land, that I began it a few Thursdays ago when my copy of Ian Rankin’s latest Edinburgh crime novel, Saints of the Shadow Bible, failed to arrive from the UK. I had pre-ordered the Rankin book from UK Amazon so it would ship immediately on publication, unwilling to wait for its US publication in mid-January. But when it didn’t come on that Thursday, I downloaded and began reading the free portion of Shavit’s book. The Rankin book arrived the next day, but too late. I was hooked on Shavit.

Since finishing the Shavit book, I have been slow to turn to Rankin, despite my love of his famous character John Rebus and my eagerness to learn of Rebus’s newest exploits. The new book and last year’s The Impossible Dead are unexpected gifts, what with Rebus’s retirement in Exit Music a few years ago and Rankin’s introduction of a new character, Malcolm Fox, in two subsequent novels. It didn’t appear that Rebus was coming back.

But he has, twice now. Why wasn’t I diving in? I suppose the problem is that I have grown accustomed to reading on my Kindle or iPad. No need to turn on a light when I go to bed or wake up. Thus, I’ve spent the last week avoiding Rebus, instead downloading opening portions of other novels and trying them out. Like, for instance, Meg Wolitzer’s The Interestings, which I considered reading when it came out earlier this year, and which I saw mentioned by someone last week in an end-of-year list of favorite books. And another book, Bart Paul’s Under Tower Peak, which came to my attention two nights ago when I was reading online yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, with its own best-of-the-year lists. The Paul book makes the list of ten best mysteries as the closing recommendation:

And “Under Tower Peak,” Bart Paul’s suspenseful debut, accompanies a pack-station guide in California’s Sierra Nevada through a hair-raising adventure starting with the mountaintop discovery of a dead billionaire inside a crashed plane.

I hadn’t recalled seeing mention of this book before. On further investigation, I found that the NYT hadn’t reviewed it, but the WSJ did, back in April, with Tom Nolan concluding that “the nonstop action in “Under Tower Peak” is well-paced, the plot twists surprising (even shocking) and the occasional humor welcome. In the end, it’s that right-stuff quality known as true grit that … elevates this fine first novel into a must-read book.”

Wow!

Yesterday morning, I read the free opening portion, at which point the moment of decision had come. Download the rest and keep reading? Or turn to Rankin and Rebus? I chose Rebus, mostly for fear that if I keep delaying, its US publication will occur. I dare not leave the book unread that long. I paid the extra cost of shipping from the UK, after all, in order to receive the physical book. (One can’t download the e-version of a UK book onto a US Kindle if the book hasn’t been published here yet.) I can’t let it sit until the US Kindle version becomes available.

I’m now a fifth of the way through and enjoying it immensely. Too bad I deferred reading it.

What next? Maybe back to Under Tower Peak. Probably not The Interestings. Another possibility is Alice McDermott’s Someone, a novel that is on some book-of-the-year lists and whose free portion I read some weeks ago. Or one of the many history books on my reading list.

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